2010 Mar vol 4

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Invasive species are a part of our lives, so much so that we don’t even notice that a number of the plants and animals around us are foreigners. More importantly, their impact on native biodiversity goes unnoticed. In this issue, we have contributions from distinguished scholars working on a diverse assemblage of invasive species, and within these pages you will !nd some unlikely invaders—elephants in the Andamans, mosquitoes in Hawaii, and domestic cats everywhere.

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Invasive species are a part of our lives, so much so that we don’t even notice that a number of the plants and animals around us are foreigners. More importantly, their impact on native biodiversity goes unnoticed. In this issue, we have contributions from distinguished scholars working on a diverse assemblage of invasive species, and within these pages you will !nd some unlikely invaders—elephants in the Andamans, mosquitoes in Hawaii, and domestic cats everywhere. Over the past three years Current Conservation has been a source of research news and conservation stories, but from this volume onwards we are bringing about a change in our pro!le to include a broader variety of material, a new look, and a revamped website to engage those of you interested in conservation, science or simply just nature. For instance, are books ever too old to be read? We introduce a new book review section—‘Book from the Attic’, where we solicit reviews of dated, but nonetheless pivotal, books that have changed the way we view the natural world around us. And what better book to inaugurate this section than one of Darwin’s? Page 36 reviews Darwin and his thoughts on animal emotions. As Current Conservation transforms into this new avatar, we solicit your participation, feedback and any input you may care to give us. We look forward to hearing from you.
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